Wednesday

All posts tagged Wednesday

A magnitude 8.3 earthquake hit off the coast of Chile on Wednesday, shaking buildings in the capital city of Santiago and generating a tsunami warning for Chile and Peru.Chile’s government urged residents to evacuate the coastline. The mayor of Illapel, which is near the epicenter, said on a radio broadcast that one person had been killed by a collapsing wall, and 15 others were reported injured. Some homes were damaged as well.Reuters witnesses said the quake was felt as far away as the Argentine capital, Buenos Aires, on the eastern seaboard of South America. The quake struck 105 miles (169 km) north of Valparaiso at a depth of 15.5 miles (25 km), and was originally reported as magnitude 7.9, the U.S. Geological Survey said. Hazardous tsunami waves from the quake were possible along the coasts of Chile and Peru within the next several hours, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said. A tsunami watch was also issued for Hawaii.Peruvian authorities said waves of less than 1 meter (3 feet) could hit the country’s southern shoreline at 8:30 p.m. local time (2130 ET) and urged people to avoid coastal areas.

If tsunami waves impact Hawaii, the estimated earliest arrival time would be 3:06 a.m. Hawaii Standard Time (0906 ET) on Thursday, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said. Less than an hour after the initial earthquake, three aftershocks all greater than magnitudes 6.1 struck the region, USGS reported.

Chile’s state copper miner Codelco [COBRE.UL] [CODEL.UL] said none of its workers were injured and there was no damage to its installations following the quake in the world’s top copper exporter. Antofagasta Plc (ANTO.L) also reported no damage to its flagship Los Pelambres copper mine. In February 2010, an 8.8-magnitude earthquake in central-southern Chile triggered a massive tsunami, and more than 500 people were killed. In the hours following that quake, President Michelle Bachelet and other government officials misjudged the extent of damage and declined offers of international aid. That delayed the flow of assistance to disaster areas, leaving many survivors feeling they had been abandoned by the government.

Compounding matters, the Chilean navy’s catastrophe-alert system failed to warn the population of impending tsunamis, leaving hundreds who survived the initial quake to be engulfed by massive waves that followed. Bachelet´s government was also slow to prevent looting following the quake, and fumbled the death toll, later rolling back its estimate and saying missing people who later turned up alive had …Read More

By Brian Murphy and Thomas Gibbons-Neff,
Russia acknowledged Wednesday that it has military advisers in Syria and left open options to expand its weapons training and assistance amid increasing friction with the West over Moscow’s backing for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.
Although Russia has provided military support to Assad for years — and the presence of advisers does not signal a policy shift — the extent of Moscow’s aid has taken on added resonance as unprecedented numbers of Syrian refugees and others from the region stream into Europe.
This week, the United States urged Greece and Bulgaria to reject overflight requests for Russian aircraft, fearing that Moscow seeks to increase its arms shipments to Assad’s forces. Iran, however, has agreed to open its airspace to Russian planes carrying “humanitarian cargo” bound for Syria, according to Russia’s TASS news agency.
Russia’s Foreign Ministry called Washington’s intervention “international boorishness” in a statement Wednesday, saying Moscow only seeks to help the Syrian government fight Islamist militants.
On Wednesday, Secretary of State John F. Kerry telephoned Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov for the second time in five days, telling his counterpart that a Russian buildup in Syria could escalate the conflict there.
[Syria major rift between Moscow and Washington]
“Russia has never made a secret of its military-technological cooperation with Syria. Russian military specialists help Syrians master Russian hardware,” Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova told journalists in Moscow on Wednesday.
She added that Russia also would consider “extra measures to intensify counterterrorism efforts in Syria” if needed but did not describe any possible plans.
Zakharova also gave no details on the number of Russian military personnel in Syria, but she noted that Moscow is “providing assistance to Syrians in training them to operate Russian military” equipment.
Two U.S. officials quoted by Reuters said that tank-landing ships, additional aircraft and a contingent of naval infantry had recently been deployed to the country.
The officials seem to confirm recent reports on social media that a brigade based in Sevastopol, Crimea, was on its way to Syria.
The Syrian port of Tartus has offered Russian warships a strategic base in the Mediterranean, but it remains unclear how many Russian military personnel are at the site. There also have been reports of Russian forces …Read More

On Wednesday Apple AAPL unveiled its newest lineup: a revamped Apple TV, bigger iPad Pro, and new iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus.
Shortly after Tim Cook ended the live portion of the event — which featured a surprise performance by rock band One Republic — the company opened up its demo area to journalists so those in attendance could test out its new gadgets.
The first product I managed to try out was the same device Apple opened the event with: the iPad Pro. As I scrutinized the device I couldn’t help but chuckle over the device’s 12.9-inch screen. My initial thought was that Apple was playing some sort of joke on critics, since at first glance the iPad looks like a prop from the Carrot Top show.
The laughing soon stopped after I learned more about the large tablet. An Apple representative walked guests through its new setup by launching two apps found in the Microsoft Office app (which is now optimized for a bigger screen) to demonstrate iOS 9’s new multi-tasking features. The representative was able use both Word and Excel at the same time without any apparent hiccups or performance issues. Clearly, this is a tablet meant to target enterprise users.
The same multi-tasking feature will also be included in the iPad Air 2 and made available for older iPads, although the latter will have limited functionality. It’s obvious that the iOS 9’s split-screen mode was made with a larger display in mind; the fact the iPad Air 2 is capable of the same feature is simply just a bonus.
Weighing in at 1.57 pounds, the iPad Pro is roughly a half-pound lighter than the Macbook and only slightly heavier than the iPad Air 2. Although, due to its size the iPad Pro didn’t feel heavy at all.
The iPad Pro starts at $799 for a 32-gigabyte model, with accessories such as the Apple Pencil (which the company describes a “precision input device”) costing $99 and $169 Smart Keyboard (which doubles as a stand and cover) purchased separately. Meanwhile, the device’s 128GB version will retail for $949. Apple didn’t provide an exact release date for both devices, only stating that the company’s tablet would be made available in November.
While test-driving the iPad Smart Keyboard, I found the keys to be responsive and easy for my …Read More

On Wednesday Apple AAPL unveiled its newest lineup: a revamped Apple TV, bigger iPad Pro, and new iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus.
Shortly after Tim Cook ended the live portion of the event — which featured a surprise performance by rock band One Republic — the company opened up its demo area to journalists so those in attendance could test out its new gadgets.
The first product I managed to try out was the same device Apple opened the event with: the iPad Pro. As I scrutinized the device I couldn’t help but chuckle over the device’s 12.9-inch screen. My initial thought was that Apple was playing some sort of joke on critics, since at first glance the iPad looks like a prop from the Carrot Top show.
The laughing soon stopped after I learned more about the large tablet. An Apple representative walked guests through its new setup by launching two apps found in the Microsoft Office app (which is now optimized for a bigger screen) to demonstrate iOS 9’s new multi-tasking features. The representative was able use both Word and Excel at the same time without any apparent hiccups or performance issues. Clearly, this is a tablet meant to target enterprise users.
The same multi-tasking feature will also be included in the iPad Air 2 and made available for older iPads, although the latter will have limited functionality. It’s obvious that the iOS 9’s split-screen mode was made with a larger display in mind; the fact the iPad Air 2 is capable of the same feature is simply just a bonus.
Weighing in at 1.57 pounds, the iPad Pro is roughly a half-pound lighter than the Macbook and only slightly heavier than the iPad Air 2. Although, due to its size the iPad Pro didn’t feel heavy at all.
The iPad Pro starts at $799 for a 32-gigabyte model, with accessories such as the Apple Pencil (which the company describes a “precision input device”) costing $99 and $169 Smart Keyboard (which doubles as a stand and cover) purchased separately. Meanwhile, the device’s 128GB version will retail for $949. Apple didn’t provide an exact release date for both devices, only stating that the company’s tablet would be made available in November.
While test-driving the iPad Smart Keyboard, I found the keys to be responsive and easy for my …Read More

Heartbreaking images that surfaced Wednesday of a drowned Syrian toddler’s tiny body on a Turkish beach went viral, shared by thousands of social media users around the world.The 3-year-old boy and his 5-year-old brother were reported by Turkish media to have been among 12 refugees who drowned when their boat apparently capsized while trying to make the short but treacherous journey to the Greek island of Kos.Photos carried by Turkey’s Dogan news agency showed the child face-down in on the beach, wearing a red T-shirt, blue shorts and sneakers with Velcro closings, and subsequently a Turkish police officer cradling the tiny corpse.Europe is coping with an enormous human wave of refugees, many of them from Syria, and images of recent days have shown people struggling through gaps in border fences, sleeping in train stations or trudging wearily through fields. And the world was horrified last week by news that the decomposing bodies of 71 migrants had been found in a truck by the roadside in Austria, apparently suffocated.But even against this backdrop of dramatic suffering, the dead toddler’s photo struck a nerve.The Land is full of martyrs
The Seas wash up their share
If human hearts refuse to give refuge
Then to be human means nothing at all
#Syria— Nafeesa Suleiman (@Feena94) September 2, 2015The Syrian child drowned, while the world is drowning in shame. Whose soul really lives?— ¿¿¿¿¿ ¿¿¿¿¿¿¿¿ (@AyeshaAlmazroui) September 2, 2015A Syrian boy washed off the shore in Turkey after drowning … If it breaks our hearts then we must blame no one… http://t.co/JB1jdomjMV— Dawah Man (@ImranibnMansur) September 2, 2015About 2,000 people per day are making the short crossing from Turkey to the Greek islands, with thousands more crossing the Mediterranean from North Africa. European Union states report more than 500,000 migrants and refugees have crossed the Mediterranean so far this year, and 2,600 of them have died trying to make it.READ MOREThe conflicts and failures behind the European migrant crisisGermany’s embrace of refugees spurs backlashAt a Macedonian way station, Syrian and other migrants focus on the path ahead Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.Read More

Shortly before 10 p.m. on a Wednesday in April, Tammy Castro was describing the heartbreaking story of her son’s losing battle against drug abuse. The crowded Capitol conference room, packed with marijuana-rights activists, fell silent.
Marijuana started her son on a downward spiral to his death, Castro said, holding back tears. “If you pass this bill, you are sentencing more youth to certain death.”
Castro was testifying against House Bill 2165, which would completely legalize adult use of marijuana in Texas. States like Colorado and Washington that have legalized recreational pot have created detailed structures for regulating the plant. Simpson’s approach was far more radical; he would strike any mention of marijuana from state law—no limits on the amount you could possess, no dispensaries, no state regulation.
The measure got further through the legislative process than many thought possible, progress that proponents say is a harbinger of some kind of legal pot in the not-so-distant future. With some Republicans reconsidering their opposition to marijuana, the Texas Legislature became an unexpected front in the fight to legalize it.
The bill’s author—tea party-backed, Christian conservative Rep. David Simpson (R-Longview)—and the other members of the Texas House Criminal Jurisprudence Committee soberly nodded as Castro finished her testimony.
Then Castro’s husband addressed the committee. His voice grew angry as he made eye contact with Simpson.
“I think, Mr. Simpson, that you’ve done a tremendous disservice in using God and Scripture to try to validate your point,” he said.
Simpson’s views on marijuana are grounded in his understanding of God’s intent. “I don’t believe that when God made marijuana he made a mistake government needs to fix,” Simpson told the Observer during a May interview in his Capitol office.
The Castros’ testimony, though, was powerful. Their point—marijuana is a gateway drug—has been a War on Drugs truism for generations.
Nevertheless, the committee put aside such fears and passed Simpson’s bill on a 5-2 vote. Two Republicans voted yes: Simpson and state Rep. Todd Hunter (R-Corpus Christi).
It was actually the second pot bill that had cleared the committee. Two days before, House Bill 507, which would make possession of less than 1 ounce of marijuana a civil offense, had passed on …Read More

Updated: Wednesday, April 22 2015, 04:14 PM CDT
Medical marijuana for pets is now available in Texas. You can buy capsules, treats and other edibles as natural pain relievers online. They are legal because they contain such a low percentage of THC.
A Texas veterinarian says his biggest concern is pets being used as guinea pigs.
“I’m not comfortable with having somebody say, ‘well, yeah let’s throw it out there and hope for the best and we’re going to use your pets as our experimental animals and see what works,'” said veterinarian Dr. Merten Pearson.
Veterinarians cannot prescribe cannabis products to pets, they can only recommend them.
The FDA says it is investigating the benefits of the products.
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Medical Marijuana Available For Texas PetsThis entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.Read More