Texas MMJ News

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By Robert Moore, Lindsey Bever and ,

VAN HORN, Tex. — Along the shoulder of Interstate 10, where drug runners sometimes hide in drainage culverts, U.S. Border Patrol agent Rogelio Martinez came to a stop late Saturday and got out of his vehicle.

Martinez scrambled down an embankment through ocotillo and creosote bush, splitting the darkness with his flashlight. Then, according to Border Patrol union officials, attackers struck him from behind.

Martinez, 36, was found dying moments later, apparently bludgeoned with rocks, the union officials say. Nearby was another agent who arrived with Martinez or soon after, badly beaten but alive, the officials say.

The attack described by officials would be the first killing of an on-duty Border Patrol agent since the 2010 murder of Brian Terry in Arizona. That event was a catalyzing moment in the push for tougher border enforcement, and President Trump has cited Martinez’s death to boost his case for a wall along the boundary with Mexico.

“We will, and must, build the Wall!” he tweeted, saying Martinez had been “killed.”

But the FBI, which is leading the investigation of Martinez’s death, released a statement late Monday that did not confirm the agents were attacked. The two men were found at 11:20 p.m. Saturday in a culvert area about 12 miles east of Van Horn, the statement said, with traumatic head injuries “along with other miscellaneous physical injuries such as broken bones.”

Both agents were airlifted to El Paso, where Martinez died from

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DENVER — A 12-year-old girl is spearheading a campaign to legalize medical marijuana across the whole country. Alexis Bortell said she and her family had no choice but to move from their Texas home to Colorado to treat her severe epilepsy. Now, her family and a handful of others are suing Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

They are demanding “cannabis for the treatment of their illnesses, diseases and medical conditions.”

Alexis Bortell, 12

CBS News

“Ever since I’ve been on this cannabis, I’ve actually been seizure-free for – today it’s 974 days, so we’re coming up on 1,000. So I think that’s pretty good,” Alexis told CBS News correspondent Barry Petersen.

Pretty good indeed because Alexis had seizures every few days, as seen in videos taken at the direction of her doctors.
 
Her parents said epilepsy medications didn’t work, and there was even talk of brain surgery.
 
“What do you call epilepsy?” Petersen asked.

“Well, I call it my seizure monster,” Alexis said.
 
But this seems to tame the seizure monster: an oil made from marijuana taken twice a day.
 
Her family lived in Texas where they couldn’t get the oil they needed, but they could in Colorado, where both medical and recreational pot are allowed.

For her father, Dean Bortell, the decision to move here three years ago was an easy one.
 
“I would die for her. Right? So the least I could do is uproot my life and

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HOUSTON– Cannabis lovers, Texas is weeks away from the first legal sale of medical marijuana.

The legal bud will be available for purchase for epilepsy patients looking for an alternative  to help control seizure medication.

“Even with our most modern medications and with procedures and surgeries we’re still left with a sizable portion for patients who have remaining seizures,” said Houston Kelsey Seybold Clinic neurologist Michael Newmark.

In Texas, there’s about 150,000 eligible patients with intractable epilepsy and they’re the only people who can legally purchase the drug.

The state licensed Florida based Knox medical to dispense the drug through a branch of their company, Consortium Texas. This comes two years after the state legalized the drug for epilepsy patients.

“Our main hope is that patients will have good response to this medication,”Epilepsy coordinator Valerie Coffman said.

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With Texas mere weeks away from medical marijuana, there are a few things to know about the new program, starting with its one qualifying condition: intractable epilepsy. No other conditions are allowed for now, though theoretically legislation could be passed later. Texans are just grateful that people suffering will soon find relief.

For its restrictions, it’s still a progressive law in that patients of any age will have access to the high-CBD, low-THC plant extract. The high levels of CBD are especially effective at treating seizure disorder, so this will be a blessing to the 150,000+ patients who are eligible.

It will also be a relief. It’s been two years since cannabis was legalized for epilepsy patients and now Texas has licensed Knox Medical, originally out of Florida, to dispense the cannabis medicine.

Bruce Knox is the company’s COO and started the company from his late parents’ nursery business and by teaming up with Cansortium Holdings. According to Dallas Fort Worth CBS Local, Knox recalled, “I was fortunate enough to go ask my dad about two weeks before he passed what he thought about this. He said that I never thought that it should be illegal.”

They also asked Knox CEO and founder Jose Hidalgo why he wanted to expand from Florida to Texas. He answered that he saw cannabis as the future of medicine and that there are millions and millions of people who could potentially benefit from it.

He also said that Texas and Florida are similar in

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WINTER GARDEN, Florida (CBS DFW) – Texas is weeks away from the first legal sale of medical marijuana.

Two years after lawmakers legalized the drug for epilepsy patients, the state has licensed a company operating as Knox Medical to dispense the drug.

CBS11 travelled to Winter Garden, Florida, where the company has already broken ground as one of the first medical marijuana dispensaries there.

“I never thought in a million years, I’d be growing marijuana,” admits Bruce Knox, the company’s COO and chief cultivation officer.

A half hour’s drive from Disney World, hundreds of marijuana plants are growing in the greenhouse he oversees.

“I grew up extremely… with conservative values, and I’d never even seen a cannabis plant prior to getting into this,” said Knox.

His late parents, both retired law enforcement officers, founded Knox Nursery in 1962.

In 2015, Knox teamed up his family business with Cansortium Holdings to create Knox Medical.

“I was fortunate enough to go ask my dad about two weeks before he passed what he thought about this,” recalled Knox. “He said that I never thought that it should be legal.”

In September, Texas awarded a new branch of the company, Cansortium Texas the state’s first license to dispense. Customers will see it operate and sell products under the same Knox Medical name it uses in Florida.

MORE: Read the full story at CBS DFW

© 2017 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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WINTER GARDEN, Florida (CBS11) – Texas is weeks away from the first legal sale of medical marijuana.

Two years after lawmakers legalized the drug for epilepsy patients, the state has licensed a company operating as Knox Medical to dispense the drug.

CBS11 travelled to Winter Garden, Florida, where the company has already broken ground as one of the first medical marijuana dispensaries there.

“I never thought in a million years, I’d be growing marijuana,” admits Bruce Knox, the company’s COO and chief cultivation officer.

A half hour’s drive from Disney World, hundreds of marijuana plants are growing in the greenhouse he oversees.

Bruce Knox and Andrea Lucia in marijuana greenhouse (Andrea Lucia – CBS11)

“I grew up extremely… with conservative values, and I’d never even seen a cannabis plant prior to getting into this,” said Knox.

His late parents, both retired law enforcement officers, founded Knox Nursery in 1962.

In 2015, Knox teamed up his family business with Cansortium Holdings to create Knox Medical.

“I was fortunate enough to go ask my dad about two weeks before he passed what he thought about this,” recalled Knox. “He said that I never thought that it should be legal.”

In September, Texas awarded a new branch of the company, Cansortium Texas the state’s first license to dispense. Customers will see it operate and sell products under the same Knox Medical name it uses in Florida.

Marijuana plants are now growing under tight security at a facility in Schulenburg, Texas.

“We believe

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New Jersey recreational marijuana legalization may be a highlight of 2018; it’s possible but unlikely the Trump administration will crack down on the U.S. cannabis industry; and major mainstream corporations are “not going to miss out” on the business opportunities presented by the burgeoning marijuana trade.

Those are just a few of the highlights from four keynote speakers on the opening day of the sixth MJBizCon, which began Wednesday at the Las Vegas Convention Center.

Some of the presentations conveyed negative overtones, but the general theme was unbridled optimism.

“There are many unicorns to come, and unicorns are those billion-dollar companies,” Jeanne Sullivan — a veteran of the dot-com boom and bust era — told thousands of MJBizCon attendees.

“They are out on this floor. It is your job to find them this week and to talk to them.”

Sullivan singled out companies in the sectors of cannabis testing, regulatory compliance, data analytics and well-established brands that will likely come to dominate future markets as the marijuana industry comes into its own on a national and global scale.

But those are far from the only opportunities, a point driven home by former Apple and Tesla executive George Blankenship, another of the keynote speakers.

Rather, he focused on innovation as the key to reshaping the marijuana business.

“Sooner or later, you’re going to be able to say, ‘Alexa, send me an eighth of flower,'” Blankenship said.

He noted that before the first iPhone launched in 2007, the vast majority of companies

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Dean Bortell kisses his 11-year-old daughter, Alexis, as she waits to testify during a House committee hearing on March 6, 2017, in Denver. David Zalubowski / AP file

“She just wants to be like everybody else,” Alexis’ father, Dean Bortell, told NBC News. “When she grows up she wants to be free to choose where she lives and what she does for a living. She wants to be treated like an American citizen and not just a state citizen. She doesn’t want to have to fear going to jail every time she sees a police officer.”

The suit aims to prove that the Controlled Substances Act, the statute governing federal drug policy, is unconstitutional as it relates to marijuana, according to Alexis’ attorney, Michael S. Hiller.

Joining in on the suit with Alexis are plaintiffs Marvin Washington, a former NFL lineman; Jose Belen, an Army veteran; and Jagger Cotte, a 6-year-old Georgia boy with

Leigh syndrome, all of whom use medicinal cannabis. The Cannabis Cultural Association is also named as a plaintiff, according to court documents.

“Our objective is to have the Controlled Substances Act as it pertains to cannabis declared unconstitutional so that Alexis, Jagger, Jose and the millions of other Americans who require medical cannabis can live healthy and productive lives,” Hiller said.

The Justice Department, which has filed a memorandum in support of a motion to dismiss the case, declined to comment to NBC News. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency did not immediately respond to a

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DEL RIO, Texas – U.S Customs officials seized 1,300 of marijuana coming from Mexico, through Texas, and headed for St. Louis at the Del Rio Port of Entry.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers announced Monday that a 1,300 pound stash of marijuana was found last week hidden inside a commercial trailer bound for St. Louis, Missouri.

Officials say the contraband was detected by drug dogs and non-intrusive imaging equipment inside a shipment of silica sand as it arrived from Mexico.

Read more from CBS News.

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National restrictions on marijuana use have long been stupid and hypocritical. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s stance on drugs is literally over 30 years old, which I suppose counts as “modern” for Sessions, since his stance on minorities and women is some 150 years old.

But when it comes to medical marijuana, there are no longer good arguments for it not being legal. If you are still against medical marijuana, the results are in and you are just wrong.

Perhaps this child will finally end this debate that has long been over. From ABC News:

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is being sued by a 12-year-old Colorado girl suffering from epilepsy who aims to legalize medical marijuana nationwide.

Alexis Bortell, along with her father and other plaintiffs, including former NFL player Marvin Washington, filed suit in the Southern District of New York against the attorney general as well as the Department of Justice and the Drug Enforcement Agency.

Bortell moved from Texas to Colorado so she could get “a strain of cannabis oil called Haleigh’s Hope,” which helps with her seizures. Had she remained in Texas, where medical marijuana is illegal, her next best medical option would have been brain surgery. Let’s go on and say that the marijuana treatment is better than opening up this little girl’s brain.

But, now that she’s on the stuff, Bortell is essentially trapped in Colorado or the other 29 states that allow medical marijuana usage. She can’t go back to Texas and

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